Introduction to New Technologies in Music Education

Macy Computer Lab 345 (Mac Side)

Fall 2008

 


 

 

Dr. James T. Frankel, Instructor

jtfrankel@hotmail.com

www.jamesfrankel.com

http://jamesfrankel.musiced.net

Home Phone#: (845) 735-1140

Office Phone#: (631) 390-6670

Cell Phone#: (845) 825-2142

 

 

Course Outline

 

Week One (September 8th):

General Introduction/Expectations/Overview of Course

What is Music Technology? - A brief history.

Discuss applications of music technology in the music classroom.

Assignment:           Read Chapter 1 & Chapter 14.

Post response to Question #1 on Class Blog located at http://teacherscollege.musiced.net: What is your opinion about the past, present, and future role of technology in music education?

 

Week Two (September 15th):

Administrative Applications of Technology

Creating Department newsletters, student databases, communication with parents/teachers/administration, worksheets, tests, and rotating lesson schedules.

Assignment:           Read Chapter 3.

Post response to Question #2 on Class Blog located at http://teacherscollege.musiced.net:  How can technology specifically help you to become a better music educator?

PROJECT #1: Create a Department or Studio Newsletter.  See Project #1 Guidelines.

 

Week Three (September 22nd):

The Internet in the Music Classroom

Relevant websites will be explored and evaluated.  The paradigm of Web 2.0 will be discussed and integration strategies into existing music curricula will be demonstrated.

Assignment:           Read Chapter 11 & 16

Post response to Question #3 on Class Blog located at http://teacherscollege.musiced.net: List five websites that could be used in the music classroom with a brief description of each site.

 

 

Week Four (September 29th):

Teaching with PowerPoint

Creating multimedia presentations and listening guides for teaching using PowerPoint.

Assignment:           Read Chapter 4.

Post response to Question #4 on Class Blog located at http://teacherscollege.musiced.net:  What is your opinion about the possibility of technologies such as PowerPoint taking over for a ŇliveÓ teacher?  Do you think it will ever happen?

                          

Week Five (October 6th):

OPEN LAB

Use this Open Lab time to complete PROJECT #2

Assignment:           Complete PROJECT #2: PowerPoint Presentation.  See Project #2 Guidelines.

                                    No reading assignment or discussion questions this week!

 

Week Six (October 13th):

Software for the Elementary School Music Classroom

A review of readily available general music software titles specifically geared for younger children, including: Music Ace Maestro, Sibelius Groovy, Hearing Music, Playing Music, Sibelius StarClass, Sibelius Instruments and more.

Assignment:           Read Chapter 15.

Post response to Question #5 on Class Blog located at http://teacherscollege.musiced.net: Briefly list three ways in which you could creatively utilize the software you used in class today in your teaching. 

 

Week Seven (October 20th):

Software for the Middle/High School Music Classroom

A review of some more advanced general music software titles, specifically geared for older students, including: AlfredŐs Essentials of Music Theory, Practica Musica, Sibelius Compass, AlfredŐs Interactive Musician, Band-in-a-Box and more.

Assignment:           PROJECT #3: Technology-Based Lesson Plan.  See Project #3 Guidelines.

 

 

Week Eight (October 27th):

Introduction to Notation Software

Discussion on the advantages/disadvantages of notation software in regard to the composition process.

Tutorial on how to use Sibelius. 

Assignment:           Read Chapter 7.

Post response to Question #6 on Class Blog located at http://teacherscollege.musiced.net: What are the issues concerning notation software in regard to the composition process, and what are your opinions about those issues?

 

Week Nine (November 3rd):

Teaching with Notation Software

A review of some of the many teaching applications that notation software affords, including worksheets, composition exercises, and other project ideas.

Assignment:           Read Chapter 8 & Chapter 12.

Post response on the Class Wiki located at

http://ahm4029.pbwiki.com (password: macy345)

 Music Technology Glossary

 

Week Ten (November 10th):

Notation Software – Advanced Features

Demonstration of some of the more advanced features of Sibelius including composing full scores, extracting parts, web publishing, adding lyrics, and recording.

Discuss expectations for PROJECT #4: COMPOSITION WITH NOTATION SOFTWARE.  See Project #4 Guidelines.

Assignment:           Work on PROJECT #4.

 

 

Week Eleven (November 17th):

OPEN LAB TIME FOR PROJECT #4: COMPOSITION WITH NOTATION SOFTWARE

This time is scheduled for students to work on PROJECT #4. 

I will not be at this class session as I have Back-To-School Night this evening.  There will be a very competent substitute in my place to assist you with Project #4.

Assignment:           Work on PROJECT #4. 

 

 

Week Twelve (November 24th):

Utilizing GarageBand in the Music Classroom

An in-depth look at GarageBand and all of itŐs basic functions. 

 

Assignment:           Read Chapter 2

COMPLETE PROJECT #4: COMPOSITION WITH NOTATION SOFTWARE.  See Project #4 Guidelines.

 

Week Thirteen (December 1st):

Advanced Features of GarageBand      

A closer look at GarageBand with an in-depth look at some of the more advanced features of the program. 

Assignment:           Work on PROJECT #5: GarageBand COMPOSITION.  See Project #5 Guidelines.

                                   

        

Week Fourteen (December 8th):

Podcasting in the Music Classroom
An overview of how to create podcasts, publish podcasts on iTunes or a website, and some educational applications of podcasting.           

Assignment:           Complete PROJECT #5: GarageBand COMPOSITION.  See Project #5 Guidelines.

                                    Post response to Question #7 on Class Blog located at http://teacherscollege.musiced.net: What role do you feel the Internet will play in the future of music education?  Why?

           

Week Fifteen (December 15th):

To Burn Or Not To Burn? ItŐs More Than an Ethical Question

Review of GarageBand compositions.

We will explore the ethical and legal ramifications of burning music illegally from Peer-To-Peer File Servers such as LimeWire and KaZaa.

Assignment:  Have a great break!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EVALUATION & ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

 

The following is a breakdown of the criteria that will be used to assess your work for this course.  The criteria are divided into two categories: 2-Credit and 3-Credit.  If you have any questions or concerns about the criteria, please make an appointment to speak with me, or email me.  Scoring rubrics and Project descriptions will be distributed for each project.

 

2 Credits

-Attendance at all class sessions is expected.  If you are absent for more than three class sessions, you will be required to complete an additional project for each absence.

-Responses to the eight discussion questions: 1.25 points each – 10 points

-Choose ONE Project (Project #1, 3, 5) - 25 points each

-Project #2 – 25 points

-Project #4 – 40 points

 

Total: 100 points

 

3 Credits

-Attendance at all class sessions is expected.  If you are absent for more than two class sessions, you will be required to complete an additional project for each absence.

-Responses to the eight discussion questions: 1.25 points each – 10 points

-Project #1, 2, 3, 5 – 15 points each

-Project #4 – 30 points

 

Total: 100 points

 

* - Those students taking this course for 2 credits MUST complete Project #2 and Project #4.  Aside from these two projects, those students taking the course for 2 credits must complete one of the three remaining projects. Those students taking the course for 3 credits must complete ALL projects.

 

Services for Students with Disabilities.  The College will make reasonable accommodations for persons with documented disabilities.  Students are encouraged to contact the Office of Access and Services for Individuals with Disabilities for information about registration  (166 Thorndike Hall).  Services are available only to students who are registered and submit appropriate documentation."   As your instructor, I am happy to discuss specific needs with you as well

 

IN Incomplete. The grade of Incomplete is to be assigned only when the course attendance requirement has been met but, for reasons satisfactory to the instructor, the granting of a final grade has been postponed because certain course assignments are outstanding.  If the outstanding assignments are completed within one calendar year from the date of the close of term in which the grade of Incomplete was received and a final grade submitted, the final grade will be recorded on the permanent transcript, replacing the grade of Incomplete, with a transcript notation indicating the date that the grade of Incomplete was replaced by a final grade.

 

 

If the outstanding work is not completed within one calendar year from the date of the close of term in which the grade of Incomplete was received, the grade will remain as a permanent Incomplete on the transcript. In such instances, if the course is a required course or part of an approved program of study, students will be required to re-enroll in the course including repayment of all tuition and fee charges for the new registration and satisfactorily complete all course requirements.  If the required course is not offered in subsequent terms, the student should speak with the faculty advisor or Program Coordinator about their options for fulfilling the degree requirement.  Doctoral students with six or more credits with grades of Incomplete included on their program of study will not be allowed to sit for the certification exam. 

 

With respect to services for students with disabilities, Mr. Richard Keller and the Office of Access and Services for Individuals with Disabilities (OASID) is prepared to assist you in providing students who have disabilities with an equal opportunity to study, work, and live at our College.

 

OASID is the institutionally approved location where people with disabilities can present clinical documentation of disability and officially request reasonable accommodations related to their disability.  In this capacity OASID can assist you in ensuring your students with disabilities an equal playing field at the College.

 

In addition to coordinating these legally mandated services OASID also serves as a College wide clearing house for disability related information and adaptive technology.

 

Please feel free to inform your students as to the office's functions and the services that are available.  You may also wish to advise students where and how to contact OASID on the first floor of Thorndike Hall (room 166) or at (212) 678-3689.

 

Please feel free to contact Richard if you have any questions or a need for additional information.  His contact information follows:

 

Richard Keller <mailto:keller@exchange.tc.columbia.edu>

Director

OASID

(212) 678-3689

 

 

 

Required Text:

Te­aching Music with Technology, 2nd Ed. by Thomas Rudolph, 2004 -GIA Publications.

 

Suggested Readings

 

Teaching Classroom Music in the Keyboard Lab by James Frankel, 2004 – SoundTree Publications.

 

Technology Guide For Music Educators Edited by Scott Watson, 2005 – Thomson Publications.

 

Technology Strategies for Music Education 2nd Edition by Rudolph, Mash & Williams, 2005.  TI:ME Publications.

 

Experiencing Music Technology: Software, Data, and Hardware,

3rd Edition, 2004 - by David Williams & Peter Webster - Wadsworth Publishing - comes with CD ROM.

 

Strategies for Teaching: Technology -compiled and edited by Sam Reese, Kimberly McCord, and Kimberly Walls, 2001 – MENC Publications.

 

Spotlight on Technology in the Music Classroom – edited by Elizabeth Pontiff, 2003 - MENC Publications.

 

Applications of Research in Music Technology- edited by William Berz & Judith Bowman, 1994 - MENC Publications.

 

The Digital Classroom – edited by David T. Gordon, 2000 – Harvard Education Letter.

 

Oversold and Underused: Computers in the Classroom by Larry Cuban, 2001 – Harvard University Press.

 

The Flickering Mind: The False Promise of Technology in the Classroom and How Learning Can Be Saved by Todd Oppenheimer, 2003 – Random House.

 

Free Culture: How Big Media Technology and the Law To Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity by Lawrence Lessig, 2004 – The Penguin Press.

 

The Future Of Music: Manifesto for the Digital Music Revolution by David Kusek and Gerd Leonhard, 2005 – Berklee Press.

                 

Computers and the Music Educator by David Mash, 1996 - SoundTree Publications.

 

Finding Funds for Music Technology by Thomas Rudolph, 2000 - SoundTree Publications.

 

Failure to Connect by Jane M. Healy, 1999 - Touchstone Books.

 

Growing Up Digital by Don Tapscott, 1998 – McGraw Hill Publishing.

 

Digital Divide by David Bolt & Ray Crawford, 2000 – TV Books.